new zealand electronic poetry centre

k a   m a t e   k a   o r a  

a new zealand journal of poetry and poetics


notes on contributors

I S S U E   15

Murray Edmond: freelance poet, critic and fiction writer; dramaturge for a number of theatre projects in development, which, from time to time, come to life in live performances on stage; editor of Ka Mate Ka Ora.

Michele Leggott was the inaugural New Zealand Poet Laureate 2007-09 and received the Prime Minister’s Award for Literary Achievement in Poetry in 2013. Her collections include Heartland (2014) and Mirabile Dictu (2009), both from Auckland University Press. She coordinates the New Zealand Electronic Poetry Centre (nzepc) with Brian Flaherty at the University of Auckland, and has co-edited Alan Brunton’s selected poems, Beyond the Ohlala Mountains (Titus Books 2013) with Martin Edmond. 

Arna McGuinness was awarded a BA (Hons) in English from the University of Auckland in 2016, with a research project exploring the poetry of Beth and Zoila. She currently works for a media company based in Auckland.

Paul Millar is Professor of English at the University of Canterbury. He has extensive publications in New Zealand Literature, particularly the poetry of James K. Baxter. His literary biography of novelist and cultural commentator Bill Pearson was a finalist in the 2011 New Zealand Book Awards.

Erena Shingade (previously Johnson) has recently completed an MA thesis on the Zen Buddhist poetry of Richard von Sturmer. Her writing has been published in magazines such as Potroast, Minarets, Mimicry, and Atlanta Poetry Review.

Jillian Sullivan lives and writes in Central Otago, New Zealand.  She is the author or numerous books, from poetry to novels, short story collections and creative non-fiction. She teaches workshops on creativity and writing in NZ and America. Her awards include the Highlights Fiction Award in America, the Tom Fitzgibbon Award and Maurice Gee Prize for young adult novels, the Kathleen Grattan Prize for poetry in 2011 and the Takahe Poetry Prize 2016. Her latest book.  A Way Home, is a memoir of building a new life and a strawbale house in Central Otago (Potton and Burton, 2016).

Miranda Wilson is Associate Professor of Music at the University of Idaho and the author of Cello Practice, Cello Performance(Rowman & Littlefield, 2015). Born in New Zealand, she was educated at the University of Canterbury and in Britain and America. She has published many articles on her major research interests: cello technique and literature, musicians’ performance anxiety, women composers, and music in the Soviet Union.”


I S S U E   14

Makyla Curtis is Scots Pākehā. She is studying a Master of Arts in English at the University of Auckland, alongside a Certificate of Languages in te reo Māori. She was awarded a BA (hons) with first class honours in 2016 and was the recipient of the Kendrick Smithyman award in poetry and the Professor Terry Sturm award in New Zealand and Australian Literature in 2015. She is a letterpress printer, poet and printmaker with an interest in languages and dialects, DIY publications (zines), and typography. http://makyla.wordpress.com

Michele Leggott was the inaugural New Zealand Poet Laureate 2007-09 and received the Prime Minister’s Award for Literary Achievement in Poetry in 2013. Her collections include Heartland (2014) and Mirabile Dictu (2009), both from Auckland University Press. She coordinates the New Zealand Electronic Poetry Centre (nzepc) with Brian Flaherty at the University of Auckland, and has co-edited Alan Brunton’s selected poems, Beyond the Ohlala Mountains (Titus Books 2013) with Martin Edmond. 

John Newton is an independent researcher based in Wellington.  He is the author of The Double Rainbow: James K. Baxter, Ngati Hau and the Jerusalem Commune (VUP, 2009); and three books of poetry, most recently Family Songbook (VUP, 2013).

Brian Potiki: Brian has been a thief (mainly books and food), a father and a member of a radical Maori theatre group. Following Flaubert’s advice he’s a lamb when at home.

Vaughan Rapatahana: Especially pertinent to the piece in #14 is my instigated and co-edited follow up to English language as Hydra, which is titled Why English? Confronting the Hydra, published in June, 2016 by Multilingual Matters, U.K., in which we consider ways to fight the beast language. http://www.multilingual-matters.com/display.asp?K=9781783095841. I am also honoured to have my latest poetry collection, Atonement, nominated for a National Book Award in Philippines, where it was published earlier in 2016 by University of Santo Tomas Press. Current project is getting Colin Wilson's never published novel, Lulu, published. I have the manuscript - thanks due to his widow and my publisher, Colin Stanley - and am crafting a suitable Introduction - this book will be published by Paupers Press, England, later this year. 

Ricci van Elburg (Fredrika) started translating Dutch poems into English as part of her PhD thesis on the 1950s poets known as the ‘Vijftigers’ and the American Language poets of the 1970s. The poets represented here all lived through the German occupation of the Netherlands from 1940 to 1945, so speak from personal experience about war.
 


I S S U E   13

Tony Beyer’s publications include Jesus Hobo (Caveman Press, 1971), The Meat (Caveman Press, 1974), Weatherboard (Square One Press, 2000) and Dream Boat: selected poems (HeadworX, 2007). His recent work has appeared in Landfall, Otoliths, Sport and Best New Zealand Poems 2012.

Pam Brown, author of many books, lives in Sydney. She is currently proofing Alibis - a bilingual edition of her poems translated into French by Jane Zemiro. The book is due from publishers Société Jamais-Jamais in April 2014.

Jen Crawford is the coordinator of the Creative Writing Programme at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. She is a poet from Aotearoa/New Zealand. Her book and chapbook publications include Bad Appendix (Titus Books), Napoleon Swings (Soapbox Press) and Pop Riveter (Pania Press). 

Chris Parr is a Professor of Religious Studies (doctorate in Religion & Literature) at Webster University, St Louis, Missouri USA, where he runs a monthly poetry reading series. He is also a poet originally from Aotearoa/New Zealand. Book and chapbook publications include Introducing James K. Baxter (1983), Going to find it … (St Louis Projects/JK Publishing), and Kiwi Wandering (Original Copies Press).

Jack Ross is a Senior Lecturer in Creative Writing at Massey University's Albany Campus. His edition of  Leicester Kyle's Millerton Sequences appeared from local publisher Atuanui Press in early 2014. Further details of this and other publications can be found on his blog, The Imaginary Museum.

Marcia Russell was the first woman journalist in a metropolitan news room in New Zealand and later the founding director of News and Current Affairs for TV3. Her 1996 book, Revolution: New Zealand from Fortress to Free Market, is based on her major eponymous documentary series. She was honoured with an O.B.E. for her services to journalism in 1996. Her interest in women journalists who also had literary careers informed her M.A. In 2011 she was awarded a University of Auckland Doctoral Scholarship to pursue that interest. Sadly, Marcia died in December, 2012 before completing her thesis. The University awarded her an M.Litt with first class honours on the basis of the first three chapters.

Susan Schultz is author, most recently, of Dementia Blog(2008), Memory Cards: 2010-2011 Series(2011), and "She's Welcome to Her Disease": Dementia Blog, Vol. 2(2013), all from Singing Horse Press in San Diego. She is Professor of English at the University of Hawai`i-Mānoa.


I S S U E   12

Eleanor Catton’s first novel, The Rehearsal, was published to international acclaim in 2007. In 2012 she was the Auckland University Writer-In-Residence, where she completed her second novel, The Luminaries, due out later this year

Anna Jackson's most recent collection of poetry is Thicket, published by Auckland University Press in 2011.  She is currently working on a sequence of poems written in the voice of Clodia, the original "Lesbia" of the love poems of Catullus (written between about 60-54BC), as well as other poems from a range of different perspectives and voices.  She lectures in English literature at Victoria University of Wellington. 

Michele Leggott was the Inaugural New Zealand Poet Laureate 2007-09. Her most recent publications are northland (Pania Press, 2010), Mirabile Dictu (Auckland UP, 2009) and a CD of selected poems, Michele Leggott / The Laureate Series (Braeburn/Jayrem 2009). She coordinates the New Zealand Electronic Poetry Centre (nzepc) with Brian Flaherty at the University of Auckland.

Dougal McNeill teaches in the English programme, Victoria University Wellington.

Marcia Russell came to the University of Auckland after forty years as leading New Zealand journalist. She was the first woman journalist in a metropolitan news room in New Zealand and broke new ground in women’s issues journalism as the founding editor of Thursday in 1968. She was a news editor for the fledgling TV2, and later the founding director of News and Current Affairs for TV3. She moved easily between broadcasting and print journalism and was a regular feature writer and columnist for the New Zealand Listener and Metro. Her 1996 book, Revolution: New Zealand from Fortress to Free Market, is based on her major eponymous documentary series.[1] She was honoured with an O.B.E. for her services to journalism in 1996. Her interest in women journalists who also had literary careers informed her M.A. In 2011 she was awarded a University of Auckland Doctoral Scholarship to pursue that interest. Sadly, Marcia died in December, 2012 before completing her thesis. The University awarded her an M.Litt with first class honours on the basis of the first three chapters.

Lisa Samuels: recent poetry works are Gender City (2011), Wild Dialectics (2012), and a 2-CD readings & soundscapes version of Tomorrowland (2012, now at pennsound. New poems are in recent issues of Brief, Percutio, Spoon River Poetry Review, and Hambone, and her creative non-fiction book Anti M is forthcoming from Chax Press. She teaches at The University of Auckland. 

[1] Russell, Marcia. Revolution: New Zealand from Fortress to Free Market. Auckland, N.Z.: Images Ink: Hodder Moa Beckett: TVNZ, 1996. Print

 


 

I S S U E   11

Tom Bishop is Professor of English at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. He is the author of Shakespeare and the Theatre of Wonder (Cambridge, 1996), and the co-editor of the Shakespearean International Yearbook. His translation of Ovid’s Amores (Carcanet, 2003) was a finalist in the Corneliu Popescu Prize of the Poetry Society, for poetry translated from a European language into English. He has also published articles on Elizabethan music, Shakespeare, Jonson, Australian literature and other topics, and is currently working on Shakespeare’s Theatre Games.

Martin Brooks received a Master's Degree in English Literature from the University of Auckland, and has focused on the reception of Spanish-American writing in English translation. An article-length study on the classicist Constantine Trypanis's approach to T.S. Eliot is forthcoming.

Pam Brown is a Sydney poet. She has published many books, most recently Authentic Local (Soi3 Modern Poets, 2010) and Anyworld (Flying Island Books, Macau, 2012). A booklet of new poems, More than a feuilleton, is forthcoming from Little Esther in 2012. She recently edited Fifty-one contemporary poets from Australiafor Jacket2 where she is an associate editor.

Hilary Chung is senior lecturer in Chinese and Comparative literature at the University of Auckland. She works on the comparative representation of diasporic Chineseness in literature and film and has a particular interest in works by New Zealand Chinese authors. She is the co-author of Unreal city: a Chinese poet in Auckland: Yang Lian, Auckland University Press, 2006 and has recently published on New Zealand Chinese theatre and representations of the Chinese community in Italy.

Laurie Duggan's most recent books are Crab & Winkle (Exeter, Shearsman, 2009), a new edition of The Epigrams of Martial (Boston, Pressed Wafer, 2010) and Allotments (Wendell, Mass., Fewer & Further, 2011). Forthcoming in 2012 are The Pursuit of Happiness (Shearsman), The Complete Blue Hills (Sydney, Puncher & Wattman), and Leaving Here (Brisbane, Light-Trap). He lives in the UK in Faversham, Kent.

Jacob Edmond is author of A Common Strangeness: Contemporary Poetry, Cross-Cultural Encounter, Comparative Literature (Fordham UP, 2012), and co-editor of Recentring Asia: Histories, Encounters, Identities (Brill, 2011) and Unreal City: A Chinese Poet in Auckland (Auckland UP, 2006). His articles have appeared in journals such as Comparative Literature, Contemporary Literature, Poetics Today, and The China Quarterly. He is currently working on a book entitled After the Original: Iterative Poetics and Global Culture.

Murray Edmond’s next book is forthcoming from Holloway Press, Auckland, in 2012, Three Travels, three poem sequences, ‘Narrow Roads to the East,’ ‘Ancestral Routes,’ and ‘Coming Round the Mountain.’ His article ‘One Night in Motley Cow: Grotowski and Nietzsche’ appears in Performance Research 17:1 Feb. 2012:  http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13528165.2012.651873

Joanna Forsberg is a photographer and film-maker. She collaborated with Murray Edmond to create The Fruits Of (Auckland: Holloway Press, 2010) and has illustrated Three Travels by Murray Edmond, forthcoming from Holloway Press in 2012. Her short experimental documentary, A Rehearsal for Dying, was completed in 2011.

Ted Jenner was the only member of his MA (Hons) class in Greek at Otago University in 1968. It doesn't seem to have had any adverse effect on him socially, or on his fascination with Ancient Greek. He is currently working on a monograph for Titus Books on the Gold Leaves. 

Cilla McQueen's 'Serial' was created during her term as National Library NZ Poet Laureate, 2009-11. Her poetic practice extends into visual and aural media and as a linguist she has an interest in the art of translation. Her latest book is The Radio Room (Otago University Press, 2010). 

Jan Pilditch is currently Editor of the Australasian Journal of American Studies and an Associate Professor in English, at the University of Waikato, New Zealand. In addition to publications on American authors, she is the biographer of Catherine Carswell, the Scottish writer, critic and novelist and has also published on Carswell's friends, Katherine Mansfield and D.H. Lawrence. Most recently she has published an edited and annotated edition of The Letters and Journals of John Morgan: Waikato Missionary, and is currently working on The Selected Letters of Catherine Carswell to be published later this year.

Vivienne Plumb writes poetry, fiction and drama, and is based in Auckland. She is presently completing her Doctorate of Creative Arts through the University of Wollongong, Australia, and teaching creative writing at Manukau Institute of Technology. Her most recent publication is a small collection of poems written on 'iconic' New Zealand subjects, entitled The Cheese and Onion Sandwich and Other New Zealand Icons (Seraph, Wellington).  

Jack Ross teaches Creative Writing at Massey University's Albany Campus. His latest book Celanie, a collection of translations from Paul Celan, with images by Emma Smith, is scheduled to appear later in 2012 from Pania Press. You can find further details of this and other publications at his blog The Imaginary Museum

Fredrika van Elburg studied English at Auckland University. The work of the Dutch poet Lucebert formed part of her PhD thesis, involving the translation of some of his poems. She has also translated some of David Howard's work into Dutch.

Adam Wiedemann is a widely published contemporary Polish poet with nine major collections of poetry and four prose collections. His latest book is called Odpowiadania (Wrocław: Biblioteka Rity Baum, 2012), a collection of stories. In Polish ‘opowiadania’ means ‘short story’ and by coining the neologism ‘odpowiadania’ Wiedemann has created a word that suggests something like ‘answers.’

Professor Steven J. Willett is working on his Tibullus edition, translating Russian poems for the new Penguin Anthology of Russian Verse from Pushkin to Brodsky, and assembling all his verse translations into a collection with introductory material on the various semantic, syntactical, and metrical problems facing the translator of each language (Greek, Latin, Japanese, Russian, German and Italian). He continues to divide his time between homes in Japan and Oregon.

Andrew Paul Wood is a Christchurch-based writer, curator, poet, and culture critic. He is a regular visual art and dance critic for The Press, and his cultural writings appear in the New Zealand Listener, Urbis, Architecture New Zealand, Landfall, The Sunday Star-Times, on line at Eye Contact and elsewhere. He edited the Festschrift ampersand: a catalogue of art and essays : the High Street Project (2004) and wrote essays for the books in The Real Art Roadshow (2009), Séraphine Pick (2009), and Singing in the lifeboat – the art of Jane Zusters (2010). His poetry has appeared in the usual NZ suspects, and the anthologies Another 100 NZ Poems for Children (2001), Big Sky: An Anthology of Christchurch Poems (2002), and the bilingual  Wildes Licht: Poems / Gedichte aus Aotearoa Neuseeland (2010). He is currently finishing a PhD thesis on aspects of Canterbury painting in the 1990s and being stoic about aftershocks.

Jane Zemiro was educated in Australia and France. She taught English, French and Italian at secondary school level, then, from 1985, as a Senior Lecturer at the University of Sydney, she co-ordinated and taught LOTE Teacher Education programs. She has written a series of French language textbooks:  Mini Vol 1 & 2 (Cengage, 2008), Revisions I, II, III (with Ross Steele, Hachette, 1991-93) and Tapis Volant 1 & 2, Tapis Volant Senior (with Alan Chamberlain, Thomson Learning and Cengage, 1995-2012). The Tapis Volant series has gone into several editions.  She has also translated a number of film scripts and poetry texts from English into French.



I S S U E   10

O.J. Cade is a PhD student in science communication at Otago University, where she is looking at the relationship between poetry and science.

Janet Charman's essay 'A Reading of 'Intimate Letters', The Selected Poems of Chen Li, 1974-1995, Translated and Introduced by Chang Fen-ling': is forthcoming in issue 9 of Mascara Literary Journal at: http://www.mascarareview.com/  

Murray Edmond is Editor of Ka Mate Ka Ora. The Fruits Of was published by Holloway Press in 2009, and Walls to Kick and Hills to Sing From: A Comedy with Interruptions was published by Auckland University Press in 2010.

Paula Green is a poet, children’s author and book reviewer. Her latest books include an extensive introduction to New Zealand poetry that she co-wrote with Harry Ricketts (99 Ways into New Zealand Poetry, Random House, 2010) and a new collection of poetry (Slip Stream, Auckland University Press, 2010).

Scott Hamilton’s recent publications include: To the Moon, in Seven Easy Steps (Titus Books, 2007), a miscellany of poems, polemics, and anti-travel writing; Private Bestiary (Titus, 2010) edited and annotated selection of previously unseen Kendrick Smithyman poems. Forthcoming (April 2011) The Crisis of Theory (Manchester UP), a study of British historian and political activist EP Thompson.

Selina Tusitala Marsh’s first collection of poetry, Fast Talking PI (Auckland: AUP, 2009) won the Jessie McKay Best First Book Award in 2010.  She teaches New Zealand and Pacific Literature and Creative Writing at the University of Auckland and is currently working on a Rugby World Cup poem for Auckland’s Supercity Mayor, Len Brown. 

Emma Neale is a novelist, poet and editor, who also teaches on the creative writing paper at the University of Otago. She lives in Dunedin with her husband and their two sons.

Helen Sword is an Associate Professor at the University of Auckland and has published widely on modernist literature, higher education pedagogy, digital poetics, and academic writing.  Her most recent books include The Writer's Diet (2007), Pacific Rim Modernisms (co-edited 2009) and Stylish Academic Writing (forthcoming from Harvard University Press).  Her digital poetry collection can be found at www.stoneflowerpath.com.
 



I S S U E   9

Murray Edmond edits Ka Mate Ka Ora and teaches at the University of Auckland. His latest book, Walls to Kick and Hills to Sing From: A Comedy with Interruptions, was published by Auckland UP in May 2010.

Virginia Gow (@vexus_nexus) manages websites and delivery of digital content at Auckland Museum. She likes old things and new media.

Scott Hamilton lives in Auckland. He has a PhD in sociology from the University of Auckland, and his book The Crisis of Theory: EP Thompson, the New Left, and Postwar British Politics will be published by Manchester UP later this year. He has published many essays and articles on literary as well as political and social subjects, and a collection of literary writing called To the Moon in Seven Easy Steps was published by Titus Books in 2007. His blog can be found at http://readingthemaps.blogspot.com.

Jeffrey Paparoa Holman lives in Christchurch/Ōtautahi and is currently a Senior Adjunct Fellow in the School of Humanities’ English Programme at the University of Canterbury. His most recent publication is a work of history, Best of Both Worlds: The Story of Elsdon Best and Tutakangahau (Penguin, 2010). His last two books of poetry, As Big as a Father (2002) and The Late Great Blackball Bridge Sonnets (2004), were published by Steele Roberts. Roger Hickin¹s Cold Hub Press will soon release a limited edition chapbook Autumn Waiata, and a further volume of poetry, Fly Boy, is due from Steele Roberts later this year.

Roger Horrocks has been writing literary, film and art criticism for many years. He co-edited And magazine with Leigh Davis and Alex Calder. Roger's most recent book is Art that Moves: The Work of Len Lye (Auckland UP, 2009). He is an Emeritus Professor of the University of Auckland.

Paul Millar is an Associate Professor of English at the University of Canterbury with research interests in New Zealand, Australian and Pacific Literature. His recent publications include No Fretful Sleeper: A Life of Bill Pearson (Auckland UP, 2010) and a new selection of James K. Baxter¹s poetry. He is the director of the University of Canterbury¹s newly established Humanities Computing Unit. He is currently collaborating on a book about James K. Baxter’s use of classical mythology titled The Snake Haired Muse, forthcoming from Victoria UP in 2011, and he has begun researching a biography of Charles Brasch.

Robert Sullivan belongs to the Māori tribes Ngā Puhi Nui Tonu (Ngāti Manu, Ngāti Hau) and Kāi Tahu, with affiliations to Ngāti Raukawa, and the Galway Irish. A sixth book of poetry, Shout Ha! to the Sky appeared this year from Salt Publishing, UK, and Huia Publishing brought out his seventh book, Cassino City of Martyrs also in 2010. He recently relocated to Auckland from the University of Hawai`i at Mānoa to head creative writing at Manukau Institute of Technology.

Ian Wedde is working on a screenplay of his novel Chinese Opera (Victoria UP, 2008), and a new novel will be published by Victoria UP in 2011. Ian was made an Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit (ONZM) in the 2010 Queen’s Birthday Honours for services to art and literature.

 



I S S U E   8

Jeffrey Paparoa Holman lives in Christchurch/Ōtautahi and is presently teaching in the English Programme at the University of Canterbury. He is working on a new study of the ethnographer Elsdon Best and his major Tūhoe informant Tutakangahau of Maungapōhatu, due for completion in late 2009. His last two books of poetry, As Big as a Father (2002) and The Late Great Blackball Bridge Sonnets (2004), were published by Steele Roberts.

Stephen Innes is the Special Collections Librarian at the University of Auckland. He has over 20 years experience managing and developing New Zealand and Pacific-related collections. The Library is actively developing its archival collections, including literary manuscripts.

Michele Leggott coordinates the New Zealand Electronic Poetry Centre (nzepc) with Brian Flaherty at the University of Auckland. Recent publications include Mirabile Dictu (Auckland UP, 2009), Milk & Honey (Auckland UP, 2005; Salt, UK, 2006) and Journey to Portugal (Holloway Press, 2007). She was the Inaugural New Zealand Poet Laureate 2008-09, a position since handed on to Southland poet Cilla McQueen.

Dougal McNeill teaches in the Faculty of Liberal Arts, Sophia University Tokyo.

Francis McWhannell heads Bethunes@Webb's, the rare book department of Webb's Auctions in Auckland. He is an avid reader/collector, with a particular interest in New Zealand and fine press publications. He writes occasionally and is partway through an undergraduate degree at the University of Auckland.

Jack Ross's latest book The Return of the Vanishing New Zealander came out in mid-2009 from Kilmog Press in Dunedin. His other poetry publications include three full-length collections and numerous chapbooks. He's also responsible for three novels and two volumes of short fiction. Among his other books are the Auckland UP audio/text anthologies Classic, Contemporary and New New Zealand Poets in Performance (2006-08), edited in collaboration with Jan Kemp. Jack's blog The Imaginary Museum can be found at http://mairangibay.blogspot.com/
  



I S S U E   7


John Barnett has a background in publishing and often works in collaboration with Lesley Kaiser.

Australian poet Pam Brown’s most recent book is True Thoughts (Salt Modern Poets 2008). Another collection, Authentic Local, is due from Papertiger Media in June 2009. Pam was poetry editor for Overland from 1997-2002 and currently co-edits Jacket magazine. She keeps a blog http://thedeletions.blogspot.com

Martin Edmond lives and writes in Sydney. His most recent book is The Supply Party: Ludwig Becker on the Burke & Wills Expedition. Becker was the Artist and Naturalist on that famously doomed undertaking. Martin keeps a blog http://lucaantara.blogspot.com/

Sue Fitchett is a poet, retired psychologist, conservationist and Waiheke Islander. She is co-author and editor of various books of poetry and author of Palaver lava queen (Auckland UP 2004). She was the Louis Johnson bursar 2001-02 and co-winner of the 1998 NZ Poetry Society’s International Competition. Sue comments: ‘OX art is a response to the commodification of art. When we see a RED sticker in a gallery we know someone has plenty of money to be able to spend on art. I have used Microsoft tools to make a PICTURE that has no commodity value and may also be a poem.’ 

Brian Flaherty is a digital poet, co-editor of Trout and co-cordinator of nzepc. He is currently writing a blog http://beadedinsects.wordpress.com/
'If all the great poets were given an iPhone (with camera, video/audio recorder, brushes, music, maps/gps, internet, word processor, games….) and asked to create, what would be the result? a wild night of hypertext home movies? a multimedia cypher? terabytes of digital doggerel? a google library of tapa notebooks? multicast e-poetries and twitter haikus? would they construct vast video anthologies or illustrate their poems with literal pics? maybe they would discard words completely for the sound of white noise, or techno-dance with the percussive rhythms of strobe? are poets balancing on the edge of a digital future, a sea-change into something rich and strange, or was Wittgenstein right all along?'

Tony Green lives in North Shore City and is a long time consumer and producer in the arts. He has a blog (http://Tony_Green.typepad.com) and a new book, Poussin's Humour, is in press.
long cattle prod (JT3) 28.12.08 150 x 100mm acrylic on recycled paper, is a response to the current interest in asemic poetry; see http://thenewpostliterate.blogspot.com/

Artist Paul Hartigan and curator Bill Milbank in conversation 26 March 2009
BM: You have worked with neon and had a strong interest in pop culture for many years. How does this new work fit into your current practice?
PH: The new 3D works are generically titled The Undrawn. This is brand new territory for me, a place where my core concerns remain true, yet the drawing is configured in forms perhaps not immediately recognisable as a Paul Hartigan work. The literal pop image is gone, irrevocably amended, blended, anthropomorphised into a double-coded dialogue. These works are over the top and over the Pop.
The Stolen Heart of Rabelais Gargantua, 2009. Neon and acrylic on gesso painted wood, approx 400m2.

David Howard enjoys collaboration and has recently worked with the composers Marta Jirackova (Czech Republic), Brina Jez (Slovenia) and Johanna Selleck (Australia). A CD of Johanna's settings, featuring sopranos Judith Dodsworth and Merlyn Quaife, is forthcoming from Move Records. Following David's appearance at the Fifth International Poetry Festival in Granada (2009), he is developing a project with the Dutch poet Arjen Duinker that combines poetry and pyrotechnics.

Lesley Kaiser is an artist and author who often works in collaboration with John Barnett. Her most recent exhibition, Preserve, Renew, Invent [Light Bytes] at MIC Toi Rerehiko, Auckland (2008) involved exhibiting in a number of sites (see http://www.lesleykaiser.com), and a related paper has been recently published in International Journal of the Book 5.2 (2009). She is a senior lecturer at the Auckland University of Technology School of Art and Design.

Jan Kemp lives outside Frankfurt am Main, Germany. Co-editor with Jack Ross of Auckland UP's Classic, Contemporary and New New Zealand Poets in Performance, CD and text anthologies (2006-08). A CD, Jan Kemp reads from her poems, came out from The Poetry Archive (UK) www.poetryarchive.org in 2008.

Richard Killeen was born in 1946 and lives in Auckland. He has a website http://www.richardkilleen.com. Images for nzepc can be found at http://www.nzepc.auckland.ac.nz/misc/killeen.asp and figures for ka mate ka ora are at http://www.nzepc.auckland.ac.nz/kmko/killeen2.asp

Cilla McQueen lives and writes in Bluff. She has published ten books of poetry, most recently Fire-penny and the CD A Wind Harp (Otago UP 2006).
Higgs Boson. Drawing, pencil on paper. Found quotations drawn at random from Physics World 6.9 (1993).

Selina Tusitala Marsh teaches New Zealand and Pacific literature at the University of Auckland and coordinates Pasifika Poetry Web. Her first poetry collection, Fast Talking PI (Auckland UP 2009) is accompanied by a spoken word CD. Afakasi/Totolua. ‘Afakasi’ (half of one) references a mixed blood identity forged in Aotearoa and marked by one’s ability to speak for oneself. ‘Totolua’ (two bloods) explores binaries of identity imposed by societies who are ill-equipped to decipher borderlands – places where nuance thrives and art begins.

Paul Millar is a senior lecturer in English Literature at the University of Canterbury. His book No Fretful Sleeper: A Life of Bill Pearson is forthcoming from Auckland UP in 2010. He is currently editing a new selection of the poetry of James K. Baxter to be jointly published by Carcanet Press and Auckland UP.

Tim Page is a musician and songwriter who also works as a digital media specialist at the University of Auckland. He has collaborated with Selina Tusitala Marsh on a number of multi-media poetry projects, most notably composition and production of music to complement spoken word recordings, released with Selina's poetry collection Fast Talking PI (Auckland UP 2009).

Ann Poulsen is a cultural researcher and creative practitioner. Her work in the area of image/text includes ‘Aesthetics of Abundance’ in NowSeeHear (Victoria UP 1990) and ‘Circumlocution’ on the text works of sculptor Richard Long in the journal Double Dialogues 2006. She recently submitted her doctoral thesis 'Another Way with Words: Language as twentieth-century art practice' (University of Auckland) and is an exhibited photographer, combining image and text in her artworks.

Jack Ross's latest novel EMO, the last in a trilogy made up of Nights with Giordano Bruno (2000) and The Imaginary Museum of Atlantis (2006), came out from Titus Books in 2008. He has also published two collections of short fiction and several volumes of poetry. Other books include the Auckland UP audio/text anthologies Classic, Contemporary and New New Zealand Poets in Performance (2006-08), edited with Jan Kemp. Jack’s blog can be found at http://mairangibay.blogspot.com/

Lisa Samuels teaches at the University of Auckland. Her new poetry books are Throe (Oystercatcher 2009) and Tomorrowland (Shearsman 2009). Current projects include Metropolis, a poetic fantasy of urbanisation, and Anti M, a book of omitted prose.

Helen Sword is a poet, scholar, jeweller and mosaicist who teaches digital poetics and higher education pedagogy – but not both at the same time – at the University of Auckland. Her most recent book, The Writer’s Diet (Pearson Education NZ 2007), offers academic writers a tongue-in-cheek guide to verbal fitness. Helen’s digital poetry website can be found at http://helensword.ac.nz/index.htm

Fredrika van Elburg completed a PhD in English at the University of Auckland in 2007. Her current project is a collection of translations of Dutch poetry of the 1950s into English. The translations of Kouwenaar in her essay are from this work.

Ruth Watson’s work has been included in international Biennales including Sydney (1992), Korea (1995), and surveys of New Zealand and Australian art, including Paradise Now: Contemporary Art from the Pacific (Asia Society Gallery, New York, 2004). She writes on art and currently teaches at the Elam School of Fine Arts at the University of Auckland. Her work can be seen via: http://www.tworooms.org.nz/artists/ruthwatson/
Entangled (shovel) 1.5m high. Glass road safety spheres, resin, wood and metal. 2008.

In the winter, spring and summer of 1969-1970, and later in November 1971, Ian Wedde worked with Fawwaz Tuqan in Amman, Jordan, on a book of selected poems by the Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwish, published in 1973 by Cancanet Press in the U.K. His book about the art of Bill Culbert will be published in August 2009, and a new book of poems, Good Business, in November 2009.

Albert Wendt returned to Auckland in 2008 after four years as Citizens' Chair at the University of Hawai‘i. His first solo exhibition in Aotearoa was at the Macarthy Gallery in Auckland in 2008. Since then he has had a joint exhibition at the same gallery with the prominent Samoan artist and poet Momoe Malietoa von Reiche. A new verse novel, The Adventures of Vela, is forthcoming from Huia Publishers in 2009. Albert comments: ‘I paint poems now. I also continue to write them. And sometimes I use my published poems in my paintings.’
Black Window 1, 3, 4, 5 Acrylic on canvas, 2008. 760 x 1015 mm; 760 x 1015 mm; 760 x 915 mm; 610 x 760 mm.

 


I S S U E   6

Hinemoana Baker is a writer, musician, producer and teacher of creative writing. Her Māori whakapapa traces from Taranaki through the Horowhenua down to the Ōtākou peninsula near Dunedin. Her Pākehā ancestors were from England and Bavaria. Hinemoana's first poetry collection, mātuhi | needle (2004), was co-published in New Zealand by Victoria UP and in the US by Perceval Press. She co-edited the 2007 anthology Kaupapa: New Zealand Poets, World Issues and created the sound design for I Can See Fiji: Poetry and Sound, a recording of poems by Pacific/US poet Teresia Teaiwa. She is currently finishing a new collection of poetry and a new album of songs. See also www.hinemoana.co.nz

Jon Battista (Ngāi Te Rangi, Ngā Puhi) completed her PhD thesis, ‘Me he korokoro kōmako / With the throat of a bellbird: a Māori aesthetic in Māori writing in English,’ at the University of Auckland in 2004. She has written numerous entries on Māori writers for The Oxford Companion to New Zealand Literature in English.

Barry Brickell is a well-known artist and environmentalist based in the Coromandel. See Art New Zealand online reprint at http://www.art-newzealand.com/Issues1to40/environbb.htm.

Tania Hinehou Butcher is a poet, prose writer and Secondary School teacher who lives in Palmerston North. She devotes all her time to writing and teaching. Her collection of poetry Smudged Red on Cheek was published in 2003 by Totem Press NZ. She is currently preparing a second collection of poetry for publication.

Glenn Colquhoun is a poet and children's writer. His first collection The art of walking upright won the Jessie Mackay Best First Book of Poetry at the 2000 Montana NZ Book Awards. Playing God, his third collection, won the poetry section of the same awards in 2003 as well as the readers’ choice award that year. He has written three children's picture books and published an essay with Four Winds Press entitled Jumping Ship. In 2004 he was awarded the Prize in Modern Letters. He works as a GP on the Kapiti Coast.

Elizabeth DeLoughrey is an Associate Professor in the English Department at the University of California, Los Angeles. She is the co-editor, with Renee Gosson and George Handley, of Caribbean Literature and the Environment: Between Nature and Culture (2005) and the author of Routes and Roots: Navigating Caribbean and Pacific Island Literatures (2007).

Murray Edmond edits Ka Mate Ka Ora and teaches at the University of Auckland. A new book, The Fruits Of, created with photographer Joanna Forsberg, which combines text and image, is due out from Holloway Press in 2009.

David Eggleton began performing his poetry in the 1980s, and since then has built up a strong reputation for his dynamic performance style. He has toured on the cabaret circuit around the United States, Europe and Britain, as well as performing in Australia. In 1998 he toured the Nelson area reading poetry with Hone Tuwhare. He has published five books of poetry as well as several other books. He is a critic and short story writer, and has put out several performance poetry-rock albums. He has also been involved as a poet in a number of sculpture, dance and music collaborations.

William Farrimond was born and raised in the Far North. He spent thirty years away from New Zealand, involved in university studies, teaching, theatre directing and academia in Denmark, Italy and Australia. He returned in 1996 and spent three years in an Auckland factory searching for a theatre before moving to the University of Waikato where he is currently Chair of Humanities.

Bernadette Hall lives and writes in Amberley Beach in the Hurunui, North Canterbury. She has published eight collections of poetry, most recently The Ponies (Victoria UP, 2007). In 2007 she edited Like Love Poems (Victoria UP), a collection of poems by the artist Joanna Margaret Paul, who died in 2003. In 2006 she was Writer in Residence at Victoria University of Wellington, and in 2007 as the recipient of the Rathcoola Award, she spent six months in Ireland. She is currently completing a collection of poems based on this experience.

Jeffrey Paparoa Holman lives in Christchurch/Ōtautahi and is presently teaching in the English Programme at the University of Canterbury. He is working on a new study of the ethnographer Elsdon Best and his major Tūhoe informant Tutakangahau of Maungapōhatu, due for completion in late 2009. His last two books of poetry, As Big as a Father (2002) and The Late Great Blackball Bridge Sonnets (2004), were published by Steele Roberts.

Janet Hunt published the first full-length biography of Hone Tuwhare (Godwit, 1998). Her most recent book is The Wetlands of New Zealand: A Bitter-sweet Story (Random House NZ, 2007) which won the Montana Medal for Non-fiction 2008. She is also the author of A Bird in the Hand, winner of the non-fiction category and Book of the Year award at the 2004 NZ Post Children’s and Young Adults Book Awards, and From Weta to Kauri. She lives and works on Waiheke Island.

Jan Kemp now lives outside Frankfurt am Main, Germany. Her most recent collection of poems is Dante’s Heaven (Puriri Press, 2006). Co-editor with Jack Ross of Auckland UP’s Classic, Contemporary and New New Zealand Poets in Perfomance, double CD and text anthologies (2006/07/08). She is currently working on new poems for Voiceprints and on Captions: a memoir in words & pictures. She was made a Member of the New Zealand Order of Merit (MNZM) for services to literature in 2005.

Michelle Keown is a New Zealander now living in the UK and teaching at the University of Edinburgh. Her research interests focus on Māori and Pacific literature. She is the author of Pacific Islands Writing: The Postcolonial Literatures of Aotearoa/New Zealand and Oceania (Oxford UP, 2007) and Postcolonial Pacific Writing: Representing the Body (Routledge, 2005). She edited with Stuart Murray a special issue of The Journal of New Zealand Literature focused on diasporic connections between New Zealand and the UK.

Steve Lang
is an English immigrant to Aotearoa New Zealand; he currently works as a lecturer and counsellor educator at Massey University. His PhD which is nearing completion is an autoethnographic study, and uses his poems as descriptors of his journey of discovery of a bicultural identity.

Michele Leggott coordinates the New Zealand Electronic Poetry Centre (nzepc) with Brian Flaherty at the University of Auckland. Recent publications include Milk & Honey (Auckland UP, 2005; Salt, UK, 2006) and Journey to Portugal (Holloway Press, 2007). She is the Inaugural New Zealand Poet Laureate 2008-09.

Jean McCormack is a mother, grandmother and a great-grandmother. She trained as a teacher at the age of 39 and retired in her mid-sixties. Many years were spent in researching and recording family history and her memoirs. Part of her research resulted in an essay on her great grandfather, Duncan McNeil, who was one of the many ‘Paisley Poets’ writing in the 19th century. Her poem ‘Sand’ appeared in the Listener in 2004, and she has had several short stories published. Before her marriage, she worked in Progressive Books, a left-wing co-operative bookshop in Auckland, where she met Hone Tuwhare. They married in 1949. They were divorced in the mid-seventies and had occasional contact thereafter.

Cilla McQueen lives and writes in Bluff, in the south of the South Island of New Zealand. She has published ten books of poetry, most recently Fire-penny and the CD A Wind Harp (Otago UP, 2006). Recently she was awarded an Honorary Doctorate by the University of Otago. Among many honours she has won the New Zealand Book Award for Poetry three times, the Robert Burns Fellowship at the University of Otago, a Fulbright Visiting Writers’ Fellowship, and a Scholarship in Letters.

Bill Manhire
directs the International Institute of Modern Letters at Victoria University of Wellington. His most recent publication is a book of poems, Lifted (Victoria UP, 2005); his Collected Poems (2001) was published by Victoria UP and Carcanet, UK. He has received many national honours for his creative work including the inaugural Te Mata Estate New Zealand Poet Laureateship, and the New Zealand Book Award for poetry four times.

Peter H. Marsden was educated at the Universities of Oxford, London and Manchester. He recently retired from the Department of English Studies at RWTH Aachen University. His research interests embrace both linguistics and literature, with a particular focus on Australian and New Zealand poetry. His publications include studies of individual authors such as Peter Bland, Peter Goldsworthy, Les Murray and Robert Sullivan.

Selina Tusitala Marsh teaches New Zealand and Pacific literature at the University of Auckland and coordinates Pasifika Poetry Web. Her first poetry collection, Fast Talking PI (Auckland UP) will be published in 2009. She recently performed in the Queensland Poetry festival with Polynation, an hour long, nine-poet Pasifika poetry show. See www.myspace.com/polynationpoets

John Miller is an Auckland photographer.

Michael O'Leary was born in Auckland and has hovered between the physical and intellectual aspects of life throughout his 57 years. He has written five novels, twelve books of poetry, a children's book, a thesis on small press publishing in New Zealand and other non-fiction work. He has lived in and been inspired by three main areas of New Zealand/Aotearoa: the semi-tropical lushness and multi-cultures of Auckland, the snow-covered wonder of Otago and the Paradiso of Paekakariki where ‘there is a beach to swim in and a train every half hour.’ He is of three whakapapa: Te Arawa, Irish and German.

Hana O’Regan is of Ngāi Tahu descent, After completing an undergraduate degree in Māori and Political Science at Victoria University of Wellington, she lectured in te reo at the University of Otago. Her Masters thesis, focusing on tribal identity development, was published as Ko Tahu, Ko Au (Horomako, 2001). She recently co-authored Kupu (Ake, 2007), a contemporary anthology of Māori poetry. An active writer and composer of Māori language songs, Hana is a member of the Māori Language Commission and Dean of the Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology.

Mark Pirie is the managing editor of HeadworX Press in Wellington and is a graduate of Victoria and Otago Universities. In 1995 he initiated the young writers’ magazine JAAM (Just Another Art Movement) which he co-edited until 2004. Other publications include a poetry anthology, The NeXt Wave (Otago UP, 1998), a book of short fiction, Swing, a book of song lyrics and 19 poetry collections. His most recent book is Slips, a collection of cricket poems.

Brian Potiki (Kai Tahu, Kati Mamoe) is a writer, musician, theatre director and performance artist. His plays have toured throughout the country. Aotearoa: Collected Poems and Songs (2003) was published by Steele Roberts. His most recent publication is a collection of four South Island history plays, Te Wai Pounamu, Your Music Remembers Me (Steele Roberts, 2007).

John Pule is a Niuean novelist, poet and artist who grew up in Aotearoa New Zealand. His most recent collection of poetry is 100 Love Poems (Earl of Seacliff, 2005). His publications include two acclaimed novels, The Shark that Ate the Sun (1992) and Burn My Head In Heaven (1998). He was a 2004 Arts Foundation of New Zealand Laureate; his art works are collected by major New Zealand galleries and are noted internationally.

Gavin Reedy was raised in Wainuiomata, Wellington, and now lives in Halcombe, Manawatu, in his wife Denise's tribal area Ngāti Pikiahu, Ngāti Waewae. His marae is Poupatate and he works at Te Papa Tongarewa / the Museum of New Zealand in Wellington. His interests include art, small business setups, shearing sheep and fixing V8s.

Miriam Richardson is a poet whose work is published by Peninsula Press. She knew Hone Tuwhare in Dunedin in the 1990's. She now lives on the Kapiti Coast and makes websites with My Web Workshop.

Dieter Riemenschneider taught English Language Literatures at the University of Frankfurt 1971-99 and in 1993 he set up the research/teaching centre New Literatures and Cultures in English. His main research areas include Indian, African, Australian Aboriginal and New Zealand Aotearoa Māori literature and culture. His most recent book is The Reception of the Indian Novel in English (Rawat, 2005). A bilingual (English/German) Aotearoa New Zealand poetry anthology, Wildes Licht (Wild Light), is due from Stauffenburg Verlag in 2008.

Cassie Ringland-Stewart is working on a PhD thesis at the University of Otago, addressing mystical experience in medieval and modernist texts. Her Masters thesis from the same university concerned the landscape poetry of Hone Tuwhare, Cilla McQueen and Richard Reeve.

Alice Te Punga Somerville (Te Atiawa) is a lecturer at Victoria University of Wellington, with specialisation in Māori, Pacific and indigenous writing in English. She has a PhD from Cornell University and spent time at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa during her doctoral studies. Her research interests include Comparative, Indigenous, Pacific, Māori, Postcolonial and Cultural Studies, and she is completing a book which explores Māori articulations of connection with the Pacific.

Robert Sullivan belongs to the Māori tribes Ngā Puhi Nui Tonu (Ngāti Manu, Ngāti Hau) and Kāi Tahu, with affiliations to Ngāti Raukawa, and the Galway Irish. He has received a number of literary awards. His sixth book of poetry, Shout Ha! to the Sky will be published by Salt, UK. He directs the creative writing programme at the University of Hawai`i at Mānoa, where he is an associate professor of English.

Apirana Taylor lives in Paekakariki and is descended from the Ngāti Porou, Te Whanau a Apanui, and Ngāti Ruanui tribes. He is a poet, short story writer, novelist, playwright, actor, story teller, musician and painter. He has won awards for his poetry, plays and acting, and has held writing residencies at Massey and Canterbury Universities.

Albert Wendt returned with his partner Reina Whaitiri to Aotearoa in July 2008 after spending what he describes as 'four of the happiest and most productive years' of his life in Hawai‘i, working as Citizens' Chair at the University of Hawai‘i. He has retired from academic life and now devotes his time to his writing, painting and mokopuna. A new verse novel, The Adventures of Vela, is forthcoming from Huia Publishers early in 2009. His first exhibition of paintings in Aotearoa is scheduled for November-December 2008.
 
Reina Whaitiri co-edited Whetu Moana: Contemporary Polynesian Poems in English (Auckland UP and U of Hawai‘i P, 2003) with Albert Wendt and Robert Sullivan. Her critical and creative work appears in the Greenwood Encyclopedia of Folktales and Fairytales, Growing Up Māori, The Contemporary Pacific, and Mānoa: A Pacific Journal of International Writing. She taught English Literature at the University of Auckland, and Pacific Literature and Māori Literature and Culture at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, and she is a member of the Kai Tahu tribe.

Simon Williamson (1968-1999) published in literary magazines such as JAAM and Takahe. His posthumous book, Storyteller: Poems 1988-1999, was published by HeadworX in 2002.

Briar Wood is of Te Hikutu ki Hokianga (Ngapuhi Nui Tonu), Scottish, English, Cornish and Portuguese descent. She lived in Auckland for many years before moving to the UK to study for a PhD at the University of Sussex. She is a Senior Lecturer at London Metropolitan University and her publications include poetry, stories and essays.

 


I S S U E   5

Murray Edmond edits Ka Mate Ka Ora and teaches at the University of Auckland.  A new book, The Fruits Of, created with photographer Joanna Forsberg, which combines text and image, is due out from Holloway Press in 2008.

Fredrika van Elburg has just completed a PhD at the University of Auckland English Department.  The Silliman essay is a slightly altered version of one of the thesis chapters. Her next project is a collection of translations of Dutch poetry of the 1950s into English.

Peter Simpson is on leave from the University of Auckland in 2008. He will shortly speak on McCahon in Auckland, Florence and London, and in the UK further research his book on Kendrick Smythyman, in particular his sojurn in Yorkshire and Scotland in 1969. Longer term he is preparing a book on Leo Bensemann to accompany a retrospective exhibition he is curating (with Noel Waite) for the Christchurch Art  Gallery in 2010.

Anna Smaill’s first collection of poetry, The Violinist in Spring, was published in 2005 by Victoria University Press. She is currently working on a PhD at University College Londonthat examines ideas of impersonality in contemporary American poetry,
Focusing specifically on Jorie Graham, Frank Bidart, Louise Glück and James Tate.

Niel Wright, 74, recently completed his 36,000 line epic poem THE ALEXANDRIANS after composing at the rate of about 770 lines a year for 47 years. Refer National Library on line catalogue

Ian Wedde is in London completing research for a book about Bill Culbert. A new book of poems, Good Business, is due in 2009.


I S S U E   4

Ken Bolton is an Australian poet, editor and publisher who runs Dark Horsey Books at the Experimental Art Foundation in Adelaide. At The Flash and at The Baci was published by Wakefield Press in 2006, and the Earl of Seacliff Art Workshop will publish Three Poems in November 2007 as #17 in its Mini Series. Ken’s visit to Auckland in 2006 with poet Cath Kenneally is documented in an nzepc video feature.

Alan Brunton (1946-2002) was a Wellington-based poet, performer and publisher who co-founded the theatre troupe Red Mole with Sally Rodwell (1950-2006). Their thirty-year partnership and some of the work it generated is the focus of three essays in kmko #4.

Elizabeth Caffin was Director of Auckland University Press from August 1986 to June 2007. During this time AUP published 337 books, not all of them poetry. She wrote the section on poetry since 1945 in The Oxford History of New Zealand Literature (1991, 1998). She was the President of the Book Publishers Association of New Zealand from 2003 to 2005 and in 2005 was made an MNZM for services to literature.

Martin Edmond lives and writes in Sydney. His most recent book is Waimarino County & Other Excursions (AUP, 2007). Luca Antara: Passages in Search of Australia ( East Street, 2006) was a finalist in the history section of the Montana New Zealand Book Awards in 2007.

Murray Edmond is working on a number of his own and other people's projects at the same time, including Indian Ink's new play, The Dentist's Chair, a writing/photos text with Joanna Forsberg called 'The Fruits Of' and a new book of poems.

Michele Leggott coordinates the New Zealand Electronic Poetry Centre (nzepc) with Brian Flaherty at the University of Auckland. Recent publications include Milk & Honey (AUP, 2005; Salt, UK, 2006) and Journey to Portugal (Holloway Press, 2007).


I S S U E   3

Anne Kennedy has written fiction, poetry and short stories. Her poetry sequence, Sing-song, won the Montana NZ Poetry Award and her most recent book, the narrative poem The Time of the Giants, was a finalist for the same award. She has worked as a scriptwriter and editor, and most recently adapted Dorothy Porter's verse novel, The Monkey's Mask, for the screen. She is a coeditor of Trout: an online journal from Aotearoa and the Pacific Islands. In 2006 she was visiting writer at the University of Hawai`i at Manoa, and in Fall 2007 will join the creative writing faculty there.

Paul Millar is a Senior Lecturer at Victoria University of Wellington. His books on Baxter include New Selected Poems (OUP, 2001) and Spark to a Waiting Fuse (VUP, 2001). See http://www.bookcouncil.org.nz/writers/millarpaul.html

Jack Ross's latest book, To Terezin, a travelogue about a trip to the Theresienstadt concentration camp, is due out soon from Massey University's Social and Cultural Studies monograph series. It includes poems, pictures and an essay -- as well as an afterword by Martin Edmond.

Helen Sword works in the Centre for Academic Development at the University of Auckland, lectures in the departments of English and Comparative Literature and teaches poetry to non-literature students whenever she gets the chance.


I S S U E   2

Hilary Chung teaches Comparative and Chinese literature in the School of Asian Studies at the University of Auckland.

Laurie Duggan’s most recent book is The Passenger (U of Queensland P, 2006). He has been Writer in Residence in the School of Arts, Media and Culture at Griffith University, Queensland, 2005-06 and is relocating to Kent, England, in August 2006. See Australian Literature Resources

Martin Edmond lives in Sydney. His Luca Antara: Passages in Search of Australia is due from East Street Publications, Adelaide, in November 2006. Chronicles of the Unsung (Auckland UP) won the biography section of the Montana New Zealand Book Awards in 2005.

Joel Harrison is a recent graduate of the University of Auckland in English and Law.

Jeffrey Paparoa Holman recently completed a doctoral thesis at the University of Canterbury, ‘Best of both worlds: Elsdon Best and the metamorphosis of Māori spirituality / Te painga rawa o ngā ao rua: Te Peehi me te putanga kē o te wairua Māori’. His latest poetry collection, The Late Great Blackball Bridge Sonnets, was published by Steele Roberts in 2004.


I S S U E   1

Pam Brown: Australian poet. Poetry editor of Overland 1997-2002, associate editor of Jacket from 2005

Murray Edmond: Poet. Teaches Drama and Theatre studies at the University of Auckland.

Alison Hunt: University of Auckland PhD student working on Robin Hyde.

John Newton: Teaches in the School of Culture, Literature and Society, University of Canterbury. Completing a book on Mãori and pakeha views of Baxter’s Jerusalem commune.

Suzanne Nola: Masters student in English at the University of Auckland.

Robert Sullivan: Ngã Puhi Nui Tonu; Ngãi Tahu, Ngãti Airani. Poet. Teaches Creative Writing at University of Hawai’i.

 


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Last updated 26 June, 2017